Anno domini system of dating

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In spite of these deficiencies, the dating system devised by Exiguus is now too deeply ensconced in the Western world to easily change.

At its core, that date—any date really—is just a code.

Some interesting events at that time were: 1 BCE: Some historians have concluded from their analysis of Josephus' writings that Herod the Great died in 1 BCE.

However, Josephus also mentioned that an eclipse occurred just before Herod's death.

“In the Middle Ages and Antiquity, there were multiple eras jostling for recognition.”The key wasn't what Year One was, as much as getting everyone on the same page. “But because they were so powerful and influential, people picked up their calendar and dating system because it was convenient.”While these were the dominant systems, there was a hodge-podge of various cultures with different Year Ones. “One, they use the same year, so it's the same system.

(Let's not even discuss Year Zero, seeing as this jockeying for Year One position occurred before the concept of zero had even been invented.) If we wanted to allow for commerce, trade, and simple communication across cultures to develop, we needed to be living in the same year. The Byzantine Empire started its first year in what was considered the year of creation (our 5509 B. The Church of Alexandria began its Year One in what is now 284 A. And two, when most people see it, they think it stands for Christian Era and Before Christian Era, so it doesn't really solve the problem people wanted to solve.” As the world continued to “shrink” due to the establishment of trade routes and expansion of population and as once-insular communities started opening up and exploring, a single Year One would have inevitably dominated.

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